Monday, September 30, 2013

Braille map of Washington DC


47h x 70w finished
"Well that's pretty unique" I thought to myself when I saw
the listing for the map in the auction:
VINTAGE PLASTIC BRAILLE MAP, FOUR SECTION MAP OF WASHINGTON DC, FOUR PIECES FIT TOGETHER , ALL IN BRAILLE INCLUDING THE WRITING AND THE MAP, RAILROADS, STREAMS AND ROADS IN BRAILLE, FROM 1976  "


There was one bid already for 0.99 so I put in the next bid with my maximum set to $20.
The end of the auction came along and holy cow I won the map for $1.24! 
Add in the buyers premium of 0.19 and 
sales tax of 0.07 the total came out to $1.50! 


I used 2x3s and my Kreg Jig to make the frame.
This was the first time using my Kreg jig and now I want
to use it on everything ... soooo easy

2x3 frame and ripped strips of plywood for finish framing
It took me a few days to decide how to mount the map pieces because they
don't match up to each other squarely.


I'm guessing that's from cutting them off
of whatever they were mounted on last.  I finally decided to set them
window-pane style ... leaving just a slight gap between each piece.  Some sections
are gapped more than others but that can't be helped.


I spray glued all four pieces to plywood underlayment cut to size,
and then ripped some grade A scrap plywood for the framing.
Finishing off with simple trim in the front.


The finished project weighs a ton but it looks great!
We have it hung in the front room but it's quite dark in there
so I brought it out on the front porch to take get a better photo.
The finished size is 47"h x 70"w



St Elizabeth Park then ...  now Oxon Cove Park maybe???





Thursday, September 5, 2013

Lamp lift

My favorite thrift store came through for me again.


I didn't notice it until my son's girlfriend asked me about painting another lamp that
she was thinking of buying to take back to college.
This one towered over the other lamps and was fairly grimy & messed up but I liked the shape.


It was fun to find the old newspaper stuffed in the base.


Check it out, I bought this lamp August 3rd and the dates on the paper
are from August 1956 ... *gasp* was this lamp meant to come home with me, and is
it truly 57 years old?!
Hmmm ... I choose Yes as an answer for both of those questions ;)

I read through some of the paper and was amused at how things have changed.
The 'personal' column listed the names and addresses of people who
were on vacation, where they were going and the dates they would be gone!


After taking it apart and getting all of the flaking paint off of the inside
I put some citristrip on a couple of stubborn sections and that did the trick. 
By the way I could see at the very tippy top of the neck of the glass
where no light ever shone on it, the paint was originally gold!


I bought a 50 yard roll of 2" wide satin ribbon and used most of it to
wind around the shade frame.
The original shade had pipe cleaners wrapped around the ribbons to
make the pleats but I wasn't a big fan of that so I cut strips of
trim and hot glued them into loops.  


It was then topped off with a strip of 3/4" wide satin ribbon and some
chenille-like-spiral-looping trim on the top and bottom to hide the ribbon edges
and give it a finished look.



The base, shade frame and harp were spray painted a silver
metallic ... because that was what I had on hand.
I wasn't about to go out and buy another can of spray paint just to use
a fraction of it and then have the can sit around on our
basement shelves for years to come.  Oh no not this girl ... I need that
shelf room for quarts of paint instead, that will sit around for years!


Wired it with a new 3 way socket and now ta-daa ...


shiny and new again.
Is this a lamp version of a face lift?
Did I just perform a lamp lift?




Linking up with:

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Linen, Canvas & Velvet

I just love it when something turns out far better than I pictured it:



I sewed a lovely red velvet and heavy white canvas
to the blue linen.


It was time consuming with all of that fabric cutting, seam folding
and of course sewing but I wanted the chair to have
a 'hand made' feel to it.


I just love how the fabrics play off of each other.
The striations in the linen versus the heavy duty durability of the
canvas versus the soft touch of the velvet.


A Before shot



I'm linking up with:

Thursday, August 1, 2013

My how time flies!

I tell you wuuut, there just isn't enough time in a day.
I'm sorry that I've been away since November ... the sad truth is
I took on WAY too many projects/jobs and just didn't give myself time to do much else.
I'm starting to catch up a little though ... catch my breath.
With over extending myself I didn't get very many photos
but here are a few of the projects that I've done over the past couple of months:

Boat Cover

Channel back before:  the mouse nest I could handle, but the piles of finger nail clippings made me gag.
After

Before: Beautiful chair but split rails from re-webbing with regular nails
After

No 'Before' shot ... I donated this to a charity auction.

Again no 'Before' shot, and not a very flattering After either.

Almost done hand painting a set of 8 dining chairs
After:  The two captains chairs had upholstered backs, the six side chairs were left plain.

Six boat seats
no Before shots


Building the driving console for our boat
It was meant to be covered in vinyl but I kind of liked the way it looked uncovered
So I carved in a compass, stained it and left it as is
anyone can buy a vinyl covered steering column.
I'm currently working on a wingback, two victorian chairs and a fauteuil ...  of course I didn't take a Before shot of the wingback
and I'll probably forget to take After shots of all of them but
I might remember to get one of them!




Friday, November 9, 2012

Evil Bobbin

So this is what my bobbin does when it decides to act up ... I can't figure out why it happens ... anyone have this happen to them?


Juki LU-563 ... I oil it every time I use it; keep the tension even on both threads; and I've checked the timing, it's fine.

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

71 Years Old And Counting

Want to see my most favoritest chair?

Nice 9-pack abs you got there!
It is so well built.


 Each piece of the frame is made to fit it's partner ...

... working together to create one smooth form.
Look at how the the glued piece feathers in for support and form.
All of the joints & seams are still tight, not a squeak
or separation to be found.


And this is the very best part of all:
" Uph by Frank Talarico Jr 1941" written on one of the
arm stretchers and inside the seat.



With a sample of the fabric that he used!  
The chair had been recovered at least 
twice since then so being able to see a sample of one 
of the original fabrics is exciting.


I'm slightly ashamed of the reason why I 
got the chair in the first place.
Pappy and I were at an auction and no one was bidding on it.  
I knew from glancing at it earlier that it had coil springs and I liked the front legs
so I figured why not get it for parts? 
I bid $2 and no one countered so this beautiful
piece of work came home with me ... with plans to strip it for parts.
*GASP!*


After I got a good look at it though I began to wonder if
maybe it was worth keeping.
Once my father-in-law started to dismantle it we
could see just how well it was built.
Seeing the signature sealed the deal for me ... it stays with us.

So my plan is to upholster the inside of the chair
but to leave the outside open.
I like looking at the way it is constructed and how you can see all of 
the thought and workmanship
that went into it.

I'm looking forward to sitting here with a book and keeping my toes warm.
It's already sitting in it's spot ... in front of the pellet stove where 
it can be viewed from all sides.

In honor of Frank Talarico Jr. I think I'll cover it in a cream colored
velvet to match the original.

71 years old and starting a new chapter in it's life.


Linking up to: